Aromatherapy – A Poem by Genny Lim

By Contributed | March 25, 2021

Is it not enough to sew your jeans? Is it not enough to launder your shirts or cook your favorite cuisine? Is it not enough I melt your sore and aching muscles with the scent of jasmine or oil of sandalwood to titillate your fantasies of conquest? Do I trigger your lust with the suppleness…

Our Rage is a Fire Burning Into the Soul of America

By Contributed | March 23, 2021

By Eddie Wong The news of the Atlanta spa killings hit on the West Coast on late Tuesday afternoon March 16. As news alerts of “multiple deaths at Asian spas” crawled across my computer screen, a sense of dread welled up and sank to the pit of my stomach.  Many of us who have written…

The Invisible Man

By Contributed | March 12, 2021

East Wind ezine is proud to present another short story by Charlie Chin. My phone buzzed to tell me that I had a call.  I checked the name and knew it was urgent.  I punched the number for Dr. Ira Baumberg, the Director of the Identity Crisis Center at Beth Shalom Hospital, San Francisco.  It…

Japanese American Seniors and the US Healthcare Crisis

By Contributed | March 5, 2021

By David Monkawa. There is a crisis in the Japanese American communities. It impacts all Asians, all elderly really. We have the most numbers of seniors over 65 in the nation, about 19%. More than any other race. On average, nursing homes start at $5,000 a month. Bilingual bicultural care is a lifeline for non-English…

Sansei Granddaughters’ Journey – A Path for Remembrance

By Contributed | February 28, 2021

By Miya Sommers. With the end of the community’s first entirely virtual “Day of Remembrance” season, Sansei Granddaughters’ Journey offers us a path for remembrance through art and ceremony. (Ed. Note: You can view the film by clicking on the link at the end of this review.) In this powerful 30-minute documentary, artists Reiko Fujii,…

Spying on the Asian American Movement: The FBI files 1960s and 1970s

By Contributed | February 23, 2021

By Eddie Wong. “Judas and the Black Messiah,” a drama directed by Shaka King, and “MLK/FBI,” a documentary directed by Sam Pollard, both recently released and available online, shed light on the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and local police tactics to monitor, disrupt, and destroy organizations dedicated to the liberation of Black people.  The…

Johnson’s Store by Charlie Chin

By Contributed | February 18, 2021

Ed. Note: We are proud to present Johnson’s Store, a short story by Charlie Chin.  The kids were excited.  As they drove down the highway, Makoto kept one hand on the wheel and use his free hand to point out the places he remembered.  The little town had put up a few new buildings since…

MOSF 16.1: Happy Valentine’s Day, Christine Crites of Nashville, Wherever and Whoever You Are

By Ravi Chandra | February 14, 2021

Memoirs of a Superfan Volume 16.1: Happy Valentine’s Day, Christine Crites of Nashville, Wherever and Whoever You Are February 14, 2021 As the impeachment trial to hold President Trump accountable succeeds only in putting another asterisk next to his name, I find myself emotionally exhausted by the mess: the Republican party’s avoidance of accountability, their…

Hank Aaron: An Inspiration For a Yellow Journalist

By Contributed | January 26, 2021

By William Gee Wong My parents’ restaurant in Oakland, California’s Chinatown wasn’t doing so well in 1954, so 13-year-old me, a waiter when I wasn’t in school, had quite a bit of time on my hand, especially during languid afternoons on weekends. There was always an Oakland Tribune, the hometown newspaper, sitting on a spare…

A Wei Min Sister Speaks – Then and Now

By Contributed | January 25, 2021

Ed. Note:  I read Jean Dere’s essay many years ago and it still retains a power that comes from her candid account of growing up in San Francisco Chinatown/North Beach and how that led to her to become a revolutionary.  The direct tone in her voice, unadorned and passionate, tells you immediately: this is true, this…